Thursday, June 2, 2011

Guest Interview/Review - Trail of Thread by Linda Hubalek (WOW)

Describe your book in five words or less.

Endearing Kansas pioneer women stories.

How did the ideas for your books come to you?

I started writing books in 1992 when my husband was transferred to California for a two-year engineering project. I was homesick for the Midwest and started writing about the Swedish immigrant woman that homesteaded our family farm.

What is the hardest part of writing for you? What's the easiest?

Hardest part? Getting started and staying focused. Easiest? I love the research and reading about that time period that my books are set in.

What's next for you? Are you currently working on or have plans for future projects?

Currently I'm working on my fourth book series, the Kansas Quilter, featuring my great grandmother Kizzie (Hamman) Pieratt. Born in 1874, Kizzie grew up in a large family in the Flint Hills of Kansas. She married Ira Pieratt in 1894 and had eight children over a twenty-year span.

The Pieratt family was featured in my Trail of Thread series, so the Kansas Quilter series will continue their original story into the next generation of characters.

Kizzie was known for her quilting. I'm sure at first it was a necessity to keep her brood warm, but she also completed quilts for other people for an income. As I research and write this series I’m taking a closer look at the family quilts that my great grandmother made during her ninety-seven years.

I'll piece together Kizzie's stories and photos and post them in my blog and in the finished books. Look for the first book, tentatively titled Tying the Knot in the fall of 2011.

Why did you choose to write for specific genre?

All my series have been based on real people, places and the events that went on during their lifetime. It’s a good way to get the research and story started, and it has become my chosen genre.

What's it like hearing that readers are eagerly awaiting your book's release date?

That’s what keeps me pumped up, knowing that someone out there appreciates the research and time put into writing my books. And it means I’ve touched their hearts with my words, and maybe lead them to understand the lives of their own ancestors too.

What is one question that you've always wanted to be asked in an interview? How would you answer that question?

What does your family think of you writing books? Of course my family is proud that I’m a published author, but also proud of the ancestors and farms featured in my series. My parents still live on the original farm portrayed in my first series, Butter in the Well. Because I put township maps in the books (and the roads are still the same) they know when a reader has found their farm. A car slowly drives by to look at the old house and barn featured in the series.

What was your road to publications like?

I researched ways to get my first book into print besides just sending the manuscript off to publishers and waiting for a book deal. After talking to our state’s university press I found a Kansas publisher to print and market my first two books. After learning the process through them (and they closing their business) I started my own publishing company, Butterfield Books Inc. to print and market my books.

Marketing has drastically changed over the last two decades, but I continue to find new readers as my books have been formatting into ebooks. Marketing is now done through social media and blog tours.

Where can readers find your books?

Go through
my website
to find all the links for book ebooks and print books.

Amazon Kindle

B&N Nook

Books are also available wholesale for stores, libraries and schools through Butterfield Books Inc.

How can readers learn more about you?




Review: I have to say this was a wonderful book - Little House for grown-ups. The letters tell the story of leaving for the unknown prairie and what goes on. I found each letter more enticing than the last to see where the journey would take them. I like that there are quilts that help tell the story also. The patterns are part of what goes on and the materials used are always relevant to the purpose of the quilt.

I would definately like to learn more about what goes on once they arrive. I see this as being a wonderful series of books. Write on!

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